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by David Todd McCarty | Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Frank LoBiondo announced he is retiring and won’t be running for re-election in 2018 for the US House of Representatives’ 2nd District in New Jersey. There have been rumors for years that State Senator Jeff Van Drew has his eye on the seat, and this might be his shot at it.

Van Drew is a Blue Dog Democrat who is very popular in the largely conservative district of Cape May County. He has strong name recognition and has done a good job of straddling the line between being a Democrat in a blue state while representing a Red district. He might be hard to oppose.

That certainly won’t stop Republicans from running a strong challenger, and it might be not be a lock that he would run unopposed in a primary situation. He also just ran for re-election for State Senator in 2017 but as the polls haven’t even closed yet, we don’t even know that outcome.

It could make for a very interesting race in the 2018 midterms, especially assuming Phil Murphy wins the Gubernatorial race in New Jersey. If Van Drew decides to run for the empty House seat, it could also leave open a strongly contested state senate seat he would be leaving behind.

There are a lot of moving parts. It will be interesting to see where things go.

Time to get to work.

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by David Todd McCarty | Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Back before the accident we’d always go surfing on Sunday mornings. He called it going to church.

“Come on, let’s go to church,” he’d say. “I’ll call you in the morning. We don’t want to be late.”

Then he’d laugh and slap his knee like he hadn’t said that a thousand times before. He was big knee slapper.

I can still see him, riding along in the passenger seat of my old pickup, drinking a Red Stripe, the wind in his hair, the wrinkles in his face from years in the sun even more pronounced when he smiled and he was usually smiling. He always said Red Stripe was a breakfast beer.

“It’s a little fruity,” he explained. “You know what I mean?“

The thing is, I did know what he meant. It is a good breakfast beer.

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 by David Todd McCarty | Tuesday, July 12, 2016

You see the sign before you see the motel most times. It’s a big neon one of the type of place that still advertises air conditioning and television as if these are recent inventions and worthy of bragging about. The Shady Palms Motel is not the worst place I’ve ever stayed, but I can see it from here.

The carpet has cigarette burns and the hangers don’t come loose; the televisions are bolted to the wall, the Spanish guys blast their music till all hours some nights. People fight and scream. Drunks vomit. Truth be told, the place could use a decent scrubbing and a coat of paint, but it’s cheap and quiet in the offseason, plus the owner lets me live rent free so long as I handle the handyman work. I’m not quite sure who’s getting the better deal, but I suspect it’s not me.

This town used to be quite something back in the day. The boardwalk was the place to see and be seen, with rich folks walking the boards in their finest duds. It was a quaint seaside resort for the rich. I’ve seen pictures over at the Convention Center. A real fancy place it was.

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by David Todd McCarty | Saturday, April 23, 2016

It’s a strange thing to lose a town, especially one in which you are currently living, but that seems to be the case for the town I’ve called home for almost 20 years. Many of my neighbors have been here for as many as eight generations.

The village of Goshen, New Jersey was first settled in 1693 by Aaron Leaming who raised cattle on the land. By 1710, there was a settlement and sometime around 1725, my home was built. It’s called the Tavern House and was a tavern and stagecoach stop during the mid to late 1800’s. At the end of my road, which dead ends into the marsh, the Garrison and Harker shipyard stood. Between 1859 and 1898, twenty five ships of record were built as well as a much larger number of smaller crafts.

In addition to the many old homes, Goshen is home to The Goshen Schoolhouse, which was built in 1872 and is in the process of being saved from destruction, as well as the Goshen Methodist Church that also happens to contain an historic cemetery. The church is currently up for sale.

It’s not one thing that’s caused this slow demise. One could argue that it’s simply progress. But after 300 years, you’d like to think there would be enough to keep it going.

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